When I joined Lovesac, I was given the opportunity to immerse myself in the company’s deeply rooted design philosophy – Designed for Life. At its core, the DFL vision is simple: products should be built to last and designed to evolve. However, hidden within those simple words is an incredible opportunity for designers to change the way people purchase products.

When I joined Lovesac, I was given the opportunity to immerse myself in the company’s deeply rooted design philosophy – Designed for Life. At its core, the DFL vision is simple: products should be built to last and designed to evolve. However, hidden within those simple words is an incredible opportunity for designers to change the way people purchase products.

In this new position, I was also privileged to be one of the core members of our (for now) DFL Group, as we all together work on turning this internal design philosophy into something dramatically bigger. With this mission ahead of us, I started thinking about the future. I was imagining what the future of sustainability could look like in 5, 10, even 50 years. I wondered how this philosophy, company ethos, and framework could help inspire generations of product designers, while empowering them to ultimately reinvent the material world into a world that is truly sustainable.

To me, Designed for Life is a prime example of what happens when a seemingly simple idea influences so much more. In this case, a framework for how a business can operate. It’s our hope that the DFL vision can be applied to the design industry as a whole, from companies and professionals to enthusiasts, to anyone really. We believe that every entrepreneur who develops physical, or even digital products, can be guided by this new approach to design and, ultimately, to how a business can operate.

Photo by Clark Tibbs on Unsplash

Designed for Life, as a framework, is intentionally left open and broad, acting as more of a north star than a rigid standard for what’s right and wrong. We see it as an invitation for people to challenge the construct of their current environments and strive for more. However, this new approach isn’t fresh and innovative for the sake of being fresh and innovative. It’s being posed as a “what if” question, which we believe is the cornerstone of innovation. “What if” represents a hunger for exploration, our willingness to walk in undefined territories, and a fearlessness of what lies beyond.

The DFL concept, in the true spirit of innovation, is to challenge and reinterpret anything that exists around us. It comes from the urgency of asking more questions about the things we already know and opening up the possibilities to something new. It’s a framework for emergence and creation rather than judgement and restrictions.

Photo by Jennifer Feng on Unsplash

Innovation and sustainability used to be two parallel lines. However, in the past few years, these lines have started drifting closer and closer. It’s only a matter of time before the lines meet and continue their trajectory as one. Soon enough, sustainability will stop being an extra milestone on a corporate report. It will be an essential and inherent part of any business decision. What lies ahead is for sustainability to become ubiquitous in everyday business, as well as how we approach business problems, their solutions, and every strategic decision in between. This is the future of sustainability. A future where, in order for a business to stay relevant, grow, or even break through requires adopting a meaningful and evolving practice of sustainability.

The Designed for Life framework suggests a new way of creating and growing ideas, products, and businesses. The openness of the DFL framework increases the possibilities for adoption and implementation, with the first step being that moment where we first ask ourselves “what if”. These questions challenge us to think deeper about our ideas, problems, business ventures, and products. And by accepting the idea that something could potentially be different, we’re opening the door to change, incrementally or transformationally. This is where DFL stands. We believe that through collective exploration in design and creativity can contribute to a truly sustainable future.

Thanos Stathopoulos

About Thanos Stathopoulos

Thanos Stathopoulos is currently working as the Director of Innovation Strategy at Lovesac. He holds his undergraduate degree in Architectural Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens as well as a Masters of Philosophy in Architecture & Philosophy and a Masters in Strategic Design & Management from Parsons School of Design. He has a background in management consulting, working with individuals one-on-one to increase their effectiveness, and designing new tools, which support clients in producing superior results. Prior to consulting, Thanos worked for years as an architect in several firms as well as a freelancer focusing on large scale projects and project management. For three seasons, he was the producer and host of his own T.V. program, Urban Landscapes. He is passionate about design, whether it be objects, buildings, or systems. His main interest is "design strategy" as a systemic approach for innovation.

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